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Past Trials

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A trials rider at a section of the Scottish Six Days Trial
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Past Winners

Group of past Scottish Six Days Trials winners in Fort William

Past SSDT winners gathered at the centenary Scottish in 2011.
Image: trialscentral.com

One of the most prestigious achievements a Trials rider can accomplish in their riding career is to lift the famous North British Rubber Company Trophy as winner of the Scottish Six Days Trial. Here we look back at those small band of brothers who have made this remarkable achievement.

2023

Dougie Lampkin

300 Vertigo

2022

Dougie Lampkin

300 Vertigo

2019

James Dabill

300 Beta

2018

Dougie Lampkin

300 Vertigo

2017

Dougie Lampkin

300 Vertigo

2016

Dougie Lampkin

300 Vertigo

2015

Dougie Lampkin

300 Vertigo

2014

Dougie Lampkin

300 DL12 Special

2013

Dougie Lampkin

300 Gas Gas

2012

Dougie Lampkin

300 Gas Gas

2011

James Dabill

290 Beta

2010

Alexz WIgg

290 Beta

2009

Dougie Lampkin

290 Beta

2008

Dougie Lampkin

270 Beta

2007

James Dabill

300 Montesa

2006

Graham Jarvis

290 Sherco

2005

Sam Connor

290 Sherco

2004

Graham Jarvis

290 Sherco

2003

Joan Pons

290 Sherco

2002

Amos Bilbao

250 Montesa

2000

Steve Colley

280 Gas Gas

1999

Graham Jarvis

290 Bultaco

1998

Graham Jarvis

250 Scorpa

1997

Steve Colley

270 Gas Gas

1996

Dougie Lampkin

250 Beta

1995

Dougie Lampkin

250 Beta

1994

Dougie Lampkin

250 Beta

1993

Steve Colley

260 Beta

1992

Steve Colley

260 Beta

1991

Steve Saunders

260 Beta

1990

Steve Saunders

260 Beta

1989

Steve Saunders

305 Fantic

1988

Steve Saunders

303 Fantic

1987

Jordi Tarres

260 Beta

1986

Thierry Michaud

301 Fantic

1985

Thierry Michaud

301 Fantic

1984

Thierry Michaud

300 Fantic

1983

Toni Gorgot

330 Montesa

1982

Bernie Schreiber

280 SWM

1981

Giles Burgat

280 SWM

1980

Ytjo Vesterinen

349 Montesa

1979

Malcolm Rathmell

310 Montesa

1978

Martin Lampkin

350 Bultaco

1977

Martin Lampkin

350 Bultaco

1976

Martin Lampkin

325 Bultaco

1975

Mick Andrews

250 Yamaha

1974

Mick Andrews

250 Yamaha

1973

Malcolm Rathmell

250 Bultaco

1972

Mick Andrews

250 Ossa

1971

Mick Andrews

250 Ossa

1970

Mick Andrews

250 Ossa

1969

Bill Wilkinson

250 Greeves

1968

Sammy Miller

252 Bultaco

1967

Sammy Miller

252 Bultaco

1966

Alan Lampkin

250 BSA

1965

Sammy Miller

250 Bultaco

1964

Sammy Miller

500 Ariel

1963

Arthur Lampkin

250 BSA

1962

Sammy Miller

500 Ariel

1961

Gordon jackson

350 AJS

1960

Gordon Jackson

350 AJS

1959

Roy Peplow

199 Triumph

1958

Gordon Jackson

350 AJS

1957

Johnny Brittain

350 Royal Enfield

1956

Gordon Jackson

350 AJS

1955

Jeff Smith

500 BSA

1954

Artie Ratcliffe

350 Matchless

1953

Hugh Viney

350 AJS

1952

Johnny Brittain

350 Royal Enfield

1951

John Draper

350 BSA

1950

Artie Ratcliffe

350 Matchless

1949

Hugh Viney

347 AJS

1948

High Viney

347 AJS

1947

Hugh Viney

347 AJS

1939

Allan Jeffries

349 Triumph

1938

Fred Povey

348 Ariel

1937

Jack WIlliams

348 Norton

1936

Billy Tiffen

343 Velocette

1935

Bob McGregor

499 Rudge

1934

Jack Williams

348 Norton

1933

Len Heath

497 Ariel

1932

Bob McGregor

499 Rudge

Why are there no winners before 1932?

The first question on everyone's lips when they look at the past winners of the Scottish Six Days Trial is "Why are there no winners prior to 1932?". The automatic assumption is that records don't go back that far, but actually it's because there was no outright winner prior to 1932.

The way that we score trials today bears no resemblance to those early years. When the SSDT began there were no sections at all. The Scottish road surfaces and hills were considered to be enough of a trial, and the only way that you incurred penalties was by falling away from the time schedule. The route was scheduled around an average speed of twenty miles per hour, and if you reached a time check more than ten minutes late or early, then you incurred penalties. Those who finished the trial with no time penalties won a gold medal, with silver and bronze medals being awarded to all other finishers based on the number of penalties incurred.

In 1914, the rules were tightened up. Every entrant was given a time card and the leeway given at a time check was reduced from ten minutes down to five....and to think people complain about time nowadays! At the same time penalties were introduced for late starting and the route was built to include seven optional hills. The awards system worked in much the same way as before, but if you didn't complete at least five of the seven optional hills you couldn't win a gold medal.

In 1926 four categories in which penalties could be incurred were established. Those were reliability, hill-climbs, daily condition of machine and a brake test. This was also the year that the awards changed. You no longer got a gold medal for completing the trial with no penalties, instead you won a silver cup. Gold medals were awarded to those with no more than three marks lost, silver medals to those with no more than fifteen marks lost and bronze medals to all other finishers, unless you were unfortunate enough to have list more than one hundred and fifty marks, in which case you were disqualified!

1931 saw big changes. Observed hills were introduced with penalties incurred for putting your foot down, and awards were allocated on a percentage basis at the end of the trial, much as they are today. However, there was still no individual winner—it was only the following year in 1932 that the Edinburgh & District Motor Club decided to introduce an award for the best individual performance. The rest, as they say, is history!